CERAMIC INVALID FEEDERS,
PAP BOATS
AND
BABY BOTTLES
OF THE
19TH AND 20TH CENTURY


BY
EILEEN MICHAEL ALLISON

 

Invalid feeders are still used in many European countries.Most Americans have never used an invalid feeder or even seen one. In America they seem not to have been used much past 1930 and even many nurses working at that time have no knowledge of them. Certainly the supply of imported feeders was greatly diminished by the restrictions imposed during World War I.

American made invalid feeders and pap boats are, unfortunately,not very common,and ceramic baby bottles appear to be non-existent. A look at the pottery industry in early America helps to explain why. America has never been as big a manufacturer of ceramics as many European countries. It had a late start. When Meissen of Germany, Se'vres of France and Wedgwood, Worcester, and Chelsea of England, to name just a few, were making beautiful ceramics and experimenting to produce even more lovely wares, America was still an English Colony. As such, American colonists purchased, as was expected, and in fact required by law, most of their china from England. It must be remembered that the "colonies" were established to enrich England, not compete with her!


The McKinley Act was passed in 1891. This required the country of origin to be marked on articles imported into the United States. MOST FEEDERS WERE NEVER MEANT TO BE IMPORTED INTO THE U.S. ,thus there was no need to mark them. AN UNMARKED FEEDER IS NOT AN INDICATION OF OLD AGE.

 

On marked feeders it is helpful to remember:

After 1891

country of origin needed on items imported into the United States

 

 

 

1891 1921

may find "NIPPON" on Japanese feeders

 

 

 

1910 onwards

"made in_____" often found on ceramics of all countries

 

 

 

1920 onwards

"Bone China" may be found on English ceramics

 

 

 




ALL DATES BELOW ARE APPROXIMATE AND MY "BEST GUESS" ONLY!!!!

CUP FEEDERS

1800 - 1875

Straight spouts were the norm

 

 

 

1800 - 1880

Flat halfcovers used almost exclusively

 

 

 

1875

Curved spouts became common and by 1880's are the norm

 

 

 

1890's

Convex covers began to appear

 

 

 

1911

Both flat and convex covers used

 

 

 

1925

Almost all half covers are convex

 

 

 

1927 onwards

Some feeders began to have short spouts placed high on the feeder. This gives them a squat appearance

 

 

 



Older cup feeders usually have straight spouts, flat half covers and frequently sit on straight foot rims. Minton, Coalport, and Davenport are exceptions, they usually have curved spouts and Davenport feeders have splayed foot rims.


Open silver ones from the last part of the 1600's. Ceramic from the late 1700's to 1880's (with the exception of the "duck billed" that was made until the 1940's or 50's.)!

"Transitional" shape feeders, mid 1800's to early 20th century. Some of the most elaborate are c1900.

BOAT SHAPE

 

Mid 1800's to present. Often called pap boats in the latter part of the 19th century. Called invalid feeders in the 20th century.

CERAMIC BABY BOTTLES

 

1800 - 1890 Almost no change in shape during the time they were made.

 

The above images are from Mark & Cynthia Wallet's Collection


This Page Last Updated By Ed Bogucki On 1/19/07


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